Academic Events

Red Statue right

Featured Events

 

Upcoming Events

Roger Finke, Penn State

Wednesday, January 28, 2015
116 Katz Building
1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Dr. Roger Finke, Professor of Sociology and Religious Studies, will talk about religion.

This lecture, sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies, is free and open to the public.

Resuming Maurice: Maeterlinck and Literary Celebrity

Philip Mosley, Penn State Worthington Scranton
Monday, February 2, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

James Piazza, Penn State

Wednesday, February 4, 2015
116 Katz Building
1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Dr. James Piazza, Professor in the Department of Political Science, will talk about terrorism.

This lecture, sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies, is free and open to the public.

The Disintegration of Civil War Memory in Brown v. Board Literature

Michael LeMahieu, Clemson
Monday, February 9, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Kare Aas, Ambassador of Norway

Wednesday, February 11, 2015
116 Katz Building
1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Mr. Kare Aas, Ambassador of Norway, will talk about the Arctic via video conferencing.

This lecture, sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies, is free and open to the public.

The First Hebrew Shakespeare Translations

Lily Kahn, University College London
Monday, February 16, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Sounds of Resistance: Kurt Masur and the Leipzig Gewandhaus vs. “actually existing Socialism” between 1970 and 1989

Juliane Schicker, Penn State
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

This talk will examine how Kurt Masur used his concert hall as a space of political dissidence for more than twenty years. His personal actions and artistic choices contributed to a vision that countered “actually existing Socialism” and advocated a humanist utopia within a restrictive state. Considering Masur’s artistic choices and the connections between the classical music apparatus and the East German state, I claim that classical music was used to overcome censorship, surveillance, and physical borders. I show how the position as Gewandhauskapellmeister provided Masur with a level of cultural authority that allowed him to take certain liberties in dealing with the political and cultural party officials without the fear of negative repercussions. The talk will question the still commonly held assumption that in East Germany, classical music performances were merely an extension of the state. The findings will contribute to the research on resistance culture in the GDR, and help explain the varied ways in which people in the state tried to adapt to or change the political apparatus.

Juliane Schicker is a doctoral student in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her research has been supported by grants from the Max Kade Foundation, the Center for Global Studies, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and the College of the Liberal Arts. Her research interests include questions of identity, the artistic expression of the Self and the other, the connection between literature, music, and society, as well as the cultural past of East Germany.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Towards an Aesthetics of Stigmata: From Van Gogh's Paintings to Claire Denis's Films

Sabine Doran, Penn State
Monday, February 23, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Mirrored Resonance: Writing English in Chinese Characters

Jonathan Stalling, Oklahoma
Monday, March 2, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Title TBD

Mykola Polyuha, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Monday, March 16, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Title TBD

Matthew Hart, Columbia
Monday, March 23, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Conservatism, Orthodoxy and Intellectual Change: the Qingyuan School of Learning in Early Modern China

Courtney Rong-Fu, Penn State
Wednesday, March 25, 2015
101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Courtney’s project explores the survival state of Cheng-Chu Confucianism during the mid to late Ming period, focusing on the Qingyuan School. It is situated in the intersections of intellectual, cultural and socio-economic histories. By examining the institutional formation of academies, textual production, cultural consumption, book markets, printing and publishing industries, and overseas trade in Quanzhou, it hopes to lay bare the larger contexts in which an intellectual lineage developed and thrived. My study reveals a complex picture of interconnections between a host of historical dynamics, showing how intellectual forces were bound up with material ones, and local developments were nested in the global contexts. It provides glimpses into a slice of Chinese early modernity, as conservatism nevertheless engendered change, and as intellectual development inevitably became enmeshed in global economic and cultural forces. 

Courtney Rong-Fu  is a Ph.D candidate in the dual-title program in the Department of History and the Asian Studies Program. Her interest is in socio-cultural history of late imperial China with a special focus on scholarly and literati activities. She is also interested in gender history of imperial China and the republican period.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Fine Illuminations: A Visual Essay on Refinement, Finesses, and Global Cuba

Jacqueline Loss, University of Connecticut
Monday, March 30, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Under Institutional Eyes: The Search for Collectivity in the Postsocialist Transpacific Novel

Darwin Tsen, Penn State
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m

This lecture attempts to cover the specific forms of collectivity and institutionality imagined by Mo Yan, China's most high-profile contemporary writer. China's renunciation of socialist practice was one of the biggest stories of the twentieth century: its subsequent reforms affected everyone, especially migrant workers from rural areas, who, severed from the social safety net provided by the agricultural commune, flocked to the cities for opportunities. The collectivity of the socialist commune, once central to the organization of village life, is lost to urban sprawl. Without a project that envisions a collective exceeding the conventional ways humans live in capitalist modernity, institutions now play the largest role in shaping the people's collective life.

Darwin Tsen is currently a fifth-year, dual-degree Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at Penn State. His current dissertation project, "Under Institutional Eyes: The Search for Collectivity in the Postsocialist Transpacific Novel" examines how collectivity is imagined in the novels of Mo Yan, Luo Yijun, and Karen Tei Yamashita, three authors whose disparate geographical origins are tied together by the recession of Chinese socialism and the rise of neoliberal globalization.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Title TBD

Ian Fleishman, University of Pennsylvania
Monday, April 6, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

2015 Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium

April 13, 2015 at the University of Pittsburgh
Abstracts due February 27, 2015

Penn State’s Center for Global Studies is excited to announce its involvement with the 2015 Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium, being held at the University of Pittsburgh on April 13, 2015. Penn State’s CGS will be working in conjunction with the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center to attract and highlight undergraduate research on a wide variety of global topics and issues. This event will serve as a prime networking opportunity for students looking to build careers in a global field. Any student conducting research emphasizing our interconnected world in areas such as (but not limited to) global economics, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community is encouraged to apply.

In order to apply, a student must first submit an abstract for review (due February 27). Select students will then be asked to submit a minimum of 8-page research paper to be reviewed by a panel, and to speak at the event on April 13. Students who are chosen to participate in the symposium will give a 12-minute presentation outlining their specific research. Applications and more information can be found at the University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies page. The symposium will include a keynote lecture, student presentations and student networking. Meals and round-trip transportation expenses from Penn State campuses are covered.

Title TBD

Nathaniel Mackey, Duke
Monday, April 13, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Islam and the Literary Imaginary in Twentieth Century North Africa

Hoda El Shakry, Penn State
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m

This talk will present Professor El Shakry's current book-length research project, which explores the influence of Islamic thought and philosophy on the literary milieu of the region of the Maghreb – namely, the former French colonies of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia.  Her work examines how twentieth century Arabophone and Francophone textual materials – novels, poetry, plays, as well as literary and cultural periodicals – engage with the Qurʾan, the apostolic tradition of Hadith, in addition to central debates in Islamic exegesis, jurisprudence, and philosophy.  She argues that explicating this confluence between theological and literary discourses exposes the shared formal as well as ethical concerns of both traditions.  Moreover, the imperial context of her inquiry situates this investigation within the broader transnational questions of decolonization, post-colonialism, nation-state building, and globalization.  

Hoda El Shakry is an Assistant Professor of Comparative, Arabic and African Literatures. Her teaching and research interests lie in modern literature, criticism and visual culture of the Middle East and North Africa.  Her scholarship traverses the fields of modern Arabic and Francophone North African literature, Mediterranean studies, Islam and secular criticism, postcolonial studies and narrative theory.  Her current book project explores literary engagements with the Qur’an and Islamic Thought in twentieth century Arabophone and Francophone fiction of the Maghreb.  Before coming to Penn State, Hoda El Shakry was an Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU.  Her publications include: “Apocalyptic Pasts, Orwellian Futures: Elle Flanders’ Zero Degrees of Separation” in GLQ (2010) and “Revolutionary Eschatology: Islam and the End of Time in al-Tahir Wattar’s al-Zilzal ” in the Journal of Arabic Literature (2011).  She has a forthcoming piece on Arabic literary pedagogy and the Maghreb, entitled: "Lessons from the Maghreb."

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Faculty Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary research.

Title TBD

Dorothy Wang, Williams College
Monday, April 20, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Title TBD

Jing Tsu, Yale
Monday, April 27, 2015
102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

 

The Center for Global Studies
The Pennsylvania State University
102 Old Botany Building | University Park, PA 16802
ph: 814.867.4697 | fax: 814.863.3528 | email: cgsinfo@psu.edu

Facebook logo Liberal Arts logo

Nondiscrimination Statement | Equal Opportunity | Privacy Policy | Copyright Policy | Photo Credits